Posts

Showing posts from 2016

The Nuts and Bolts of Workplace Injury Rights

Image
Featured Post
We recently talked about what you should do if you find yourself injured at work. In the minutes and hours that follow your injury, there are a number of things you must make sure get accomplished. These include documenting the accident and speaking with a qualified legal representative. It’s good to prepare to do these things before you ever get injured, in fact. Being prepared can make terrible situations like these go much more smoothly. But there is another bit of knowledge that will be helpful if you ever find yourself injured on the job. There are certain pieces of legislation that guarantee your rights, should you ever be hurt while working for an employer. If you know your rights, you’ll be a lot more certain of getting beneficial resolutions to your workplace injury claim. We’ll briefly cover a couple of these specific rights in the following. It’s important to note that there is a lot of diversity from state to state when it comes to workplace injury laws. Th…

How to Act in Your Best Interests If You Are Injured at Work

Image
Featured Post
One of the worst things that can happen to a person is to be injured at work. Even though there are rights and laws in place to put you in the best possible place during this trying time, these laws won’t act for you. It’s important to do everything you can to fight for yourself. Here are a few ways to get through a workplace injury with the best possible outcome. 1) Immediately Talk to HR and File a Claim. A Human Resources officer should be in touch with you as soon as you are hurt. If this doesn’t happen, contact them. When contacting them, ask to file a claim and make sure you investigate the matter to your heart’s content, knowing that they’ve told you everything you need to know to make your case. Turn in documents immediately, getting help if you are incapacitated or hospitalized. Don’t delay. If your business is small and without dedicated HR, it’s important to go one step further. 2) If You are Injured on the Job, Get a Solicitor. No matter who you are, but esp…

Social Media Contributing To Divorce Rates

Image
Featured PostManchester based Family Law solicitors Carter Law have noted a correlation between the use of social media and the incline of divorce rates.In 2014, a study revealed that marriage happiness and quality shared a negative trend with the use of social media and spouses in 1 out of 7 marriages admitted to contemplating separation as a result of social media creating issues in the relationship. How Is Social Media Causing Issues In Marriages?Platforms such as Facebook and Twitter make affairs easily attainable. Ex partners, new colleagues, someone you met in a bar last year are all available to contact at the click of a button. The affairs can be solely digital too rather than physical, meaning communicating with a person who you find attractive online or via text and not informing your spouse. Platforms such as Facebook and Instagram also allow people to maintain contact with potential back-up plans if their relationship was to end, making it a lot easier to move on from thei…

What a Motor Lawyer could do For You

Image
Featured Post
Every year, in the UK, around 1.5 million motorists are fined, or prosecuted for committing motoring infractions. The list of offences you can commit while driving includes speeding, driving without insurance, using a mobile while driving, failing to comply with traffic signals, and several other infractions. Given the fact that most people speed at some point while driving or make minor errors there is a tendency for drivers to accept blame automatically. People know that they make mistakes while driving, so many just assume they are guilty of the offence, and, therefore, feel obliged to take the punishment. This is understandable, laudable even. However, is just accepting the fine, points or driving disqualification wise? The simple answer is that in most situations taking this approach is actually not a good idea. Traffic authorities make mistakes
Unfortunately, when it comes to motoring offences the authorities can, and do, make mistakes. Every year, lawyers uncove…

If only I could find my training shoes

Image
I’m not a runner. I can’t think of anything worse than deliberately choosing to go out to pound down a pavement in my running gear, crippled with a stitch, sweaty of groin, moist of brow, with that hot coppery sensation of burning lungs struggling against cold air. (Ah – the memories of P.E. at school. What a joy it is to have escaped that misery.) However, I don’t live a million miles away from where this Parkrun malarkey has been taking place. I’m astounded at the extent to which the public seem to have got their knickers (or should that be leotard?) in a twist over this. What I’ve really struggled with is why the public has reacted in the way they have. The parish council never said to Parkrun, or its members, that they couldn’t run in the park. They simply said, you can either pay a nominal fee for running together as a group – to cover hogging the changing facilities, showers etc. – or you’ll have to run in the park as individuals. Personally, as a pedestrian who chooses to us…

BHS - circling in the drain

Image
In the background at work today – one of the perks of having duel screens and nobody sitting behind me - I’ve been following the Guardian’s live commentary on the unfolding BHS administration crisis. Following and grimacing, that is. Here are some excerpts. [The Guardian’s] financial editor Nils Pratley has some stern words of advice for Dominic Chappell, boss of BHS owner Retail Acquisitions […] Nils notes how Chappell is “crassly missing the required tone” when he writes in an email to staff: “I would like to say it has been a real pleasure working with all of you on the BHS project, one I will never forget.” “No, Mr Chappell, BHS was never a “project” for the staff. It is how they earned their living and made plans to fund their retirement,” writes Nils.Exactly. This isn’t just an academic talking point for 11,000 people – it’s their livelihoods. Which reminds me.  As a student nearly ten years ago, my partner had a troubling (yet fortunately brief) experience working for BHS in th…

And you thought lawyers were weird…

Image
Or at least spoke in an anachronistic manner. Personally, I think the police are worse, what with their painfully guarded style of thinking and speaking and sometimes bizarrely formal vocab and phrases. I’m sure we’ve all seen news interviews with investigating officers which border on farcical for the terminology they insist on using. No doubt that ‘police speak’ is a required element of the curriculum at Hendon for all would-be police officers. From the Law Society Gazette 11/04/16: [In 1932] the Solicitors’ Journal, complaining about ‘police speak’, noted that: a scratch was ‘an abrasion’; a bruise, ‘a contusion’; ‘assistance was procured’; and a policeman never missed an opportunity of ‘using a word with a Latin root’.[A ] Justice of the Peace complained that a policeman never found people quarrelling, there was always an ‘altercation’. He never ‘asked’ but ‘requested’.A parson, even wearing his dog collar, was only ‘a gentleman of clerical appearance’.A young constable reporte…

How a solicitor could save your driving licence

Image
Guest Post So you’ve joined the ranks of thousands of other motorists who’ve been charged with drink driving. Although you may think it’s the end of your hopes and dreams for the future, all is not lost. By hiring the kind of solicitor who knows their law on this subject, it could not only save you from a disqualification but also time, money and stress . Click here to find out the limits across breath, blood and urine in England and Wales Here are some of the ways that a motoring solicitor could save your bacon. 1) They can explain your charges in plain EnglishThere’s a lot of jargon where drink driving law is concerned, and it can often leave you confused about what your actual charge is. A drink driving solicitor will be able to explain everything to you simply, and answer any queries you have regarding your charge. For example, people can get confused over the difference between being “drunk in charge” and “drink driving”. You may not be aware that you can be arrested and cha…

Legal blogging – its downfall and (supposed) resurgence

Image
Believe it or not – and I, for one, certainly don’t believe it – legal blogging is experiencing a resurgence. A resurgence?  In legal blogs?  Really? Where’s this taking place, then? ‘Cause it’s certainly not on the web. Still, Nick Holmes pretty much nails what I think is largely behind the downfall of legal blogging (or blawging as it was once known): What has changed fundamentally is the nature of the ensuing conversation which formerly took place in the comments sections on blogs. Whilst popular sites, such as national news sites, garner sometimes thousands of (generally [edit – invariably] tedious) comments, most niche blogs receive very few (though better value) comments. The conversation these days has been sucked out of blogs and takes place mainly on Twitter and other social media, so the profile of your blog does depend a lot on your social media “reach”, but that’s another story.(Emphasis added) And, as painful as it might be to hear, he (quite rightly) picks up on the fact…

Naming storms. Why it gives me the fricking squits.

Image
I wrote this post nearly a month ago in mid February 2016.  I’ve read it a couple of times since then as I’ve pondered whether or not to publish it.  Am I being too harsh, I wondered, or getting my knickers in a twist over something trivial. In the end, I’ve decided, no – I need to say this stuff.  Someone needs to.  But I have toned the original language down considerably.  #storm-in-a-shitpot ----------------------
One of the latest things to get right on my proverbials is the ridiculous policy the Met Office have adopted of naming storms. In their infinite stupidity, they say the pilot project (with their equally ridiculous Irish counterparts) has been launched for the following reason: The naming of storms using a single authoritative system should aid the communication of approaching severe weather through media partners and other government agencies. In this way the public will be better placed to keep themselves, their property and businesses safe.I say: what absolute bolloc…

What happened to the term “information superhighway” to describe the web?

Image
Any ideas?  Because I haven’t a clue.Wikipedia says the following:The information superhighway or infobahn was a popular term used through the 1990s to refer to digital communication systems and the Internet telecommunications network. It is associated with United States Senator and later Vice-President Al Gore.Urban Dictionary gives a hypothetical example of the term being used in speech:"I just spent the afternoon cruising the Information Superhighway!"That was nineties code for a porn browsing fest.  Not that I would know anything about that.In the UK, I remember the term “information superhighway” was used by the ditzy blonde in a Philadephia (cheese spread) commercial at some point in the late 1990s.She was a card, wasn’t she?  I wonder what happened to her.

I’m back. And I’ve rediscovered my love of blogging again.

Image
Yay. High fives all round. Cue footage of me dancing the conga in an imaginary line of people. Oh wait. False start. I’ve just realised I’ve got about as much interest left in blogging as I have in deliberately impaling myself on a large rusty fish hook. What fun.

Must try harder…

Image
I had intended to have a go at the Law Society’s quiz of the year over the festive period. It didn’t happen. I scored a respectable 7 out of 12 last year. And this year?  A big fat zero.The questions seemed bizarre – obscure statistical kind of stuff about what the law society said they did in 2015. Stuff that you’d have to guess or lose an afternoon trying to research. Anyway, there’s always 2016 to try and improve.